About Me

Michael Koohafkan

I am a PhD student in the Hydrologic Sciences Graduate Group at University of California Davis. I started the doctoral program in late 2014 following completion of a Masters of Science in Environmental Engineering at University of California Berkeley, where I studied the role of fog in the hydrology of coastal watersheds in California. My doctoral research is focused on sediment transport and geomorphologic processes in large braided sandbed rivers; specifically, I collaborate with the USACE Hydrologic Engineering Center to understand the morphodynamics of emergent sandbars in the Missouri River. I have also collaborated with NOAA’s Habitat Blueprint to explore hydrologic controls on salmonid habitat quality in the Russian River estuary, and with the American Bird Conservancy on the development of an agent-based model of Interior Least Tern breeding behavior.

Publications

Koohafkan, M.C. and B.A. Younis. 2015. “Open-Channel Computation with R.” The R Journal, 7(2):249-262. (link)

Lott, C.A., S.F. Railsback, C.F. Sheppard, and M.C. Koohafkan. 2013. “Developing and Testing TernCOLONY 1.0: An Individual-based Model of Least Tern Reproduction.” ERDC/EL CR-13-2, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. Dated June 2013, 192 pp.

Koohafkan, M.C., Thompson, S.E., Leonardson, R., and Dufour, A. (2013), Broad-spectrum monitoring strategies for predicting occult precipitation contribution to water balance in a coastal watershed in California: Ground-truthing, areal monitoring and isotopic analysis of fog in the San Francisco Bay region, Abstract A41E-0102 presented at 2013 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 9-13 Dec.

Koohafkan, M.C., Thompson, S.E. and Hamilton, M.P. (2012), Predicting Potential Evaporation in Topographically Complex Terrain, Abstract H43C-1347 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 3-7 Dec.